BEO.ZONE

BeoMaster 900RG Compact

BeoMaster

Production: 1967 - 1971

Designer:

Beogram 900RG Compact was a quality, low-slung radiogram - the last significant piece of furniture that Bang & Olufsen manufactured, except for perhaps the tamboured-screen pieces of modern furniture that were the Beovision 6000, 6002 and 9000 range of televisions.

Comprising three main elements: the Beomaster 900, Beogram 1000FV record deck (with fitted SP7 pickup) and two loudspeakers the radiogram was beautiful to look at, and, complete with either a choice of natural teak or rosewood veneered finishes, the product would fit into most customers’ homes.  By the early 1970s people’s ideas were changing and with the miniaturization that transistors allowed, the emphasis would be on not the large cabinets as the Beomaster 900RG Compact represented, but on much more transportable items which could be used from room to room.

The radiogram’s speakers were of the pressure chamber type and were rated at 85 Watts output. They delivered a rich, deep sound, emphasized by the wooden cabinet. The tuner covered the FM, ML, MW, and SW wavebands and was fitted with AFC circuity to hold steady, distant radio stations. An additional option was the purchase of a stereo indicator which could be equipped to display reception of the newer stereo transmissions which had recently started.

As one expected from Bang & Olufsen, this model was in a whole class of its own, and out of the range of radiograms/stereograms that were on offer at this time, B&O’s design led the way with both looks and sound where the emphasis was on quality through and through.

Designed with flexibility in mind (despite its size) a tape recorder - like the Beocord 1500 or 2000 for example - could easily be slotted in as space had been left allowing customers to have just this choice if they so wished.  A selection of records could be handily positioned inside as well.

There were controls internally for the setting of volume, bass, and treble; tuning was carried out by a round knob. There were push-button controls for on & off, record deck and tape recorder.